My Theory on Bioshock Infinite

Bioshock_Falling

**Spoiler Warning for Bioshock Infinite**

Over the past couple of weeks I have been replaying the 2013 first-person shooter Bioshock Infinite on the Xbox 360. Though I have many thoughts related to this game that I want to flesh out more before writing about, I have a theory in relation to the world that the developer Irrational Games has created that I want to put out there, for the satisfaction of sharing if nothing else. I have not done any research into other people’s thoughts or official details on these aspects of the story, rather I want to share how I interpreted it myself when I first played it.Read More »

“It’s Just a Kids Movie” Isn’t an Excuse

Anastasia Iron Giant

Over the last few months, an argument has been brought to me a few times that I take issue with. My friends and I are fans of a lot of animated movies, so it isn’t uncommon for us to watch a fair amount of movies intended for younger audiences. During one of these viewings we were watching Anastasia, a 1999 20th Century Fox film directed by Don Bluth and Gary Goldman.

Part way through the first act I expressed that I was not enjoying the film because I did not think it was very well written. A friend of mine simply dismissed my criticisms, however, stating “It’s just a kids movie; don’t think so much about it.” This is a mindset I have always taken issue with. The genre or intended audience of something does not automatically forgive its shortcomings.Read More »

The Twelfth Doctor: A Return to Ambiguity

CapaldiEyes

Recently, my friends and I have finally been able to begin watching the latest season of Doctor Who, where Peter Capaldi takes of the role of the Doctor in his newest incarnation. While we are only a couple of episodes into the season so far, the plotlines of each episode have marked a return to something in the Doctor’s character I hadn’t really seen since David Tennant’s portrayal: moral ambiguity.Read More »

Pirates of the Caribbean & Trilogy Structure

PiratesLogo

This past week was a series of impromptu viewings of the Pirates of the Caribbean films, specifically the first three. It was my girlfriend who wanted to watch the movies, so I did not entirely sit through each one. I’m familiar with the series already, but having them on throughout the week got me thinking about trilogies, and the many things the series did right that made it compelling.Read More »

The “Original Story” Folly

This past week, the topic of writing was briefly brought up between a co-worker and I. He mentioned that he’d always wanted to write a novel, but he could never think of an original story. This is something I have struggled with, along with many other young writers I have met. We all strive for the one idea that will grow into a great and original story that nobody has quite read before. Another friend and I also knew of a young writer who apparently had an idea “so original” she dared not explain it for fear of it being stolen, leaving her without any constructive feedback.

Maybe she did have a very original idea that could be a phenomenal success, but I have my doubts. My reasoning for this is not out of jadedness or cynicism, but simply that I have come to learn that there is no such thing as a purely original story idea. Furthermore, if you strive too hard for this ideal of originality you can potentially stonewall your creativity.Read More »

Cleaning the Slate: Doctor Who & Regenerating Narrative

Over the past three weeks I have been watching a lot of Doctor Who — which I discussed starting here — and I am currently in the middle of the fourth season. David Tennant is still going strong as the Doctor, and the companions have changed a number of times now.

Knowing what’s to come in the future with Matt Smith and subsequent companions, coupled with all the changes that have already taken place, I have been thinking more and more about how daring of a series Doctor Who really is, and how brilliantly flexible the universe has been written.Read More »

Evolving Narrative & Orange is the New Black

Recently, I actually managed to binge-watch season two of the Netflix original series Orange is the New Black with my girlfriend. I emphasize being able to do this because I have realized that as someone who tries to read, play, and watch as much content as possible, it is hard finding time to actually devote a lot of attention to one thing for long periods.

I do not intend to give a formal review of the season — that being a more daunting task than I feel up to right now — so I’ll first say that the show is excellent, and I recommend it to anybody with an interest in good drama and strong female characters.Read More »

The Hard Goodbye & Subverting Male Power-Fantasy

This past week I decided to reread an old favourite of mine; Sin City: The Hard Goodbye by Frank Miller. I first fell in love with this story watching the film adaptation in 2005’s Sin City, where Mickey Rourke played the protagonist Marv, a drunken, thuggish, trench coat-wearing bruiser, who goes on a bloody spree of revenge in the name of his short-lived lover Goldie. I was captivated from the first viewing, and it is easily a movie I’ve re-watched more than any other. I’ve read the comic book volume through a number of times as well.Read More »

Experiencing God of War Part 2

NOTICE: This post contains spoilers for the God of War Series

Characters and Monsters

While I’ve stated that I love how the God of War series adapted and utilized traditional Greek Mythology into its story and world, what has always particularly wowed me about the series is how it has represented the gods, heroes, and monsters.

When compared to other representations of the gods I have seen or caught glimpses of in popular culture, there is something that has just felt right about how God of War has represented them. Though the series does still have some glaring flaws in that department — such as the unexplained absence of Apollo — their representation of the Olympians and Titans is something I’ve admired.Read More »